Thursday, March 4, 2010

Public Speaking Body Language Mistakes ? Gestures, Movement, Posture & Facial Expressions

Non-verbal communication, or body language, is an important part of public speaking Your body language includes your posture, movement, gestures, facial expressions, eye contact and voice

Non-verbal communication, or body language, is an important part of public speaking. Your body language includes your posture, movement, gestures, facial expressions, eye contact and voice. At the very least, your body language should not distract the audience and with a little practice, it can help you convey confidence and help the audience see your message more clearly.

Here are the most common gesture, movement, posture and facial expression mistakes:

GESTURE MISTAKES
? Not using gestures at all. If you keep your hands locked at your sides, you will look nervous and your presentation will lack the visual element to accompany and enhance your words.

? Keeping your hand in your pockets. This position leads down the slippery slope to slouching and a sloppier posture. And you also may unconsciously start playing with the keys or change in your pocket (yes, I''ve seen ? and heard ? it happen!).

? Fidgeting with your hands. Be aware of what your hands are doing, such as "washing" each other, grasping each other tightly, fiddling with your watch or jewelry, etc. One of my public speaking coaching clients rolled and unrolled his shirt sleeves while he presented (we solved that problem by having him wear short sleeves). If you must hold something, such as your notes or the PowerPoint remote, be conscious of how you are holding it. Too often the item becomes something for you to play with unconsciously, or in the cause of notes, a crutch that prevents you from looking at the audience.

? Holding your hands behind your back. This gesture usually resembles that of a child reciting a poem at a school assembly. When not gesturing, your hands should be in the "neutral position," hanging loosely at your sides.

? Pointing at the audience. Yes, your mother was right ? it''s not polite to point. Try an open-handed gesture instead.

? Folding your arms across your chest. Even if you are only doing this because you feel cold, this gesture will most likely be interpreted as your closing yourself off from the audience.

? Gripping the podium. This gesture is usually accompanied by the "deer in the headlights" look. If you''re using a podium, place your hands lightly on the top of it or in a relaxed hold on the edges.

? Using stilted gestures. Your gestures should be natural and flow smoothly rather than looking forced or robotic.

? Using overly rehearsed gestures. I once saw a speaker fall to his knees during his speech, which was unnecessary and struck the audience as melodramatic and insincere.

MOVEMENT MISTAKES
? Moving without purpose. Most of the time you should stand confidently in one place rather than pacing back and forth or walking aimlessly. If you do need to move, it should have a purpose. For example, walk confidently to the front of the room before you begin speaking and walk with purpose to the flipchart or to the computer.

? Shifting from your weight from one foot to the other. Many people do this unconsciously and sometimes because their feet hurt (hint: wear comfortable shoes!). Instead, stand with your feet firmly planted on the floor, with your weight equally distributed on both feet.

? Hiding behind a desk, podium or flipchart. If the room configuration is set up so you are partially obscured behind something, then you have to rely more heavily on your voice and facial expressions to convey meaning. If you are nervous and feel exposed when there''s nothing between you and the audience, practice, practice, practice ? in front of the mirror, on video, in front of a friendly group of colleagues. If you must stand behind something, do so with assurance and not as if you are shrinking from the audience.

POSTURE MISTAKES
? Standing too stiffly. Yes, you should stand up straight but it should be natural, not like you are frozen at attention. Keep your shoulders back and hold your head up so you can make eye contact. This posture conveys confidence and helps you breathe more fully.

? Slouching and keeping your head down. Not only does it prevent you from looking at the audience, but it also conveys nervousness and makes it harder for the audience to hear you.

FACIAL EXPRESSION MISTAKES
? Not smiling, ever. Unless you are delivering horrible news, it is appropriate for you to smile, even in a business setting. Smiling will relax you and, in turn, relax the audience.

? Smiling too much, especially when delivering bad news. You may be smiling or even giggling because you are very nervous, but it undermines the seriousness of your message and your sincerity. If you smile broadly or giggle while announcing mass layoffs, for example, your audience will interpret it as a sign of your lack of concern.
If you eliminate these body language mistakes from your presentation, you''ll come across as more confident and sincere and you''ll be able to communicate more effectively. Your body language will reinforce your message to the audience rather than distract from it.

Thank you.

61 comments:

zurina said...

name : zurina bt abdul rahman
id : bhd 08-07-818
class : hnd1 sec2

Assalamualaikum Madam,

I really like this post because now I realize that I have made some body movement that I should not do in delivering a speech. Now, I would like to share how to avoid some of these mistakes.

*Facial Expression
Your facial expression is another important aspect during your speech. Your emotions during your speech can be easily expressed through your facial expression. Telling the audience that you’re disappointed with the current economy without facial expression may seem like a hollow statement.

Facial expression is sincerity. Telling the people a sad statement without the corresponding facial expression doesn’t really get the message across. This might be challenging for some speakers at first because emotions have to come naturally. But it is important to provide the right facial expression. One trick you could do is to practice your facial expression in front of a mirror. You can slowly develop your facial expression until you are satisfied with what you see.


*Gestures (Arms and Hands)
Your arms and hands are the most visible part of your body during your speech. That means that these body parts are also your most important tool to convey emotions. Your hands can point, stomp with fists and other hand movements in order to tell your audience your true emotions. This is very useful when talking to a large crowd and you can’t be easily seen from a distance.

But control should be exercised when using your arms and hands. You don’t have to wave your hand in every sentence. Remember that your gestures should only be used to emphasize a point so using too many hand-gestures will remove its importance.


*Your Feet and Walking
The role of your feet is basically to support you while speaking. Your audience will most likely be sitting while you would be up on a stage standing during the whole speech. This position could easily strain your feet if you fail to balance the pressure of your body. Stand with feet firmly on the ground with your feet slightly apart of each other. A good distance is to emulate the distance of your shoulders. Spreading them too wide or too close to each other will never balance your body weight.

Another method to ease the strain on your feet is to walk around the stage. Aside from helping you prevent any strain in your feet, this is also a great way to get closer to your audience. If you are in a large stage, get out of your pulpit and walk from one end to another so that you can get closer to as much audience as possible.

lolita hippie~ said...

Name: Nor Azura binti Mohd Ali
Id: BHD08-07-769
Class: HND1 (sec4)

As a public speaker, it's critical that you become aware of what your body is "saying" to your audience. Even if you're simply nervous, shy, cold or physically uncomfortable, you must make your movements and stance correspond with your verbal delivery.

Here, we'll look at other common body language errors made by even seasoned presenters and how you can learn to avoid them when in front of a crowd.

1. Crossed Arms
- Crossing your arms creates an instant barrier between you and whomever you're speaking to. You're essentially telling everyone, "I am not being completely open; I'm going to hide some part of me." Often, presenters who have a habit of standing with their arms crossed are seen as "deceptive" or "untrustworthy".
*Solution: Work on Being "Open"

2. Not Making Eye contact
- During a presentation, a public speaker needs to be able to make eye contact with the audience members. Typically, that contact only lasts for 1-2 seconds per person, but it's essential. By not matching the gaze of others, the presenter's body is saying, "I don't want to look at you because.I'm not telling the truth.
*Solution: Practice Eye Contact

3.Wandering around the stage or room
- Are your legs restless? Do you rock back and forth while talking or move aimlessly around, uncertain where to stop? This is not only distracting for audience members, it also makes them feel uneasy, as if you're going to bolt out the door at any given moment.
*Solution: Plant Yourself and Only Move Deliberately

I already try improve myself by not doing all these mistakes and i would like to share with all of you.

Thank you

Siti said...

NAME : SITI HARYANI BINTI CHE AWANG
ID : BHD 08-07-846
CLASS : HND 1(SEC3)

Assalamualaikum and thank you for your post. Regarding from your post, I absolutely agree with that. Now I realize that body language also play the important role in our public speaking. What I am thinking is that public speaking can be the most daunting task because we make it so. No doubt I’ve heard that according to surveys, most people are more afraid of public speaking than death. Here I would like to share some problem that people usually faced in public speaking and it solution based on the post about the body language.

1. Not making eye contact

Problem: During a presentation, a public speaker needs to be able to make eye contact with the audience members. Typically, that contact only lasts for 1-2 seconds per person, but it's essential. By not matching the gaze of others, the presenter's body is saying, "I don't want to look at you because I'm not telling the truth."

Solution: Whenever you speak with another person, make certain to force yourself to make eye contact. If you're at a party and are standing in a small group of 3-4 people, practice moving your gaze from one person to the next while you're talking. Eventually, this will become more natural and will not feel forced when you're making speeches.

2. Showing No Expression

Problem: Have you ever seen someone who speaks without exhibiting any expressions at all? It's almost eerie and definitely disconcerting. Onlookers usually wonder if the person is interested in his or her topic area and may eventually tune the speaker out, assuming (often wrongly) that the subject matter can't be that important.

Solution: The next time you are scheduled to publicly speak, rehearse in front of a mirror, paying special attention to your facial expressions. Are you smiling? Do you seem approachable, believable and friendly? Are you sending the right message with your eyes, mouth and eyebrows? As you become more comfortable allowing yourself to show emotions, your speeches will be stronger and better received.

3. Wandering Around the Stage or Room

Problem: Are your legs restless? Do you rock back and forth while talking or move aimlessly around, uncertain where to stop? This is not only distracting for audience members, it also makes them feel uneasy, as if you're going to bolt out the door at any given moment!

Solution: This is an extremely common problem faced by many public speakers, but overcoming it will require some serious resolve. You'll have to be ultra-aware of where your feet are at all times, and you may simply have to "plant" yourself in one spot for the duration of your talk. Of course, if you're planning on speaking for a long time, you may wish to move occasionally; however, when you do, be deliberate. Pick a spot, walk there (slowly) and remain there.

Thank you. =)

DzZiy said...

NAME : DZUL RAHMAN B ROSELI
ID : BHD 08-07-807
CLASS : HND1 / SECTION 1

Salam...here some tips how to use body languange......

HOW TO USE BODY LANGUAGE TO KEEP YOUR AUDIENCE ENGAGED AND WANTING FOR MORE

Research shows that in face to face communication, body language makes up more than half the meaning of your communication. Your audience searches your body language for visual cues of meaning, such as your enthusiasm, credibility and emotions behind your message.

A speaker who does not change his energy state often will be visually and vocally monotonous to his audience. In this article, you will learn about a new way of looking at and harnessing the potential of body language to engage your audience dynamically.
Dynamic Postures are energy states
During a presentation, presenters usually adopt one of four main body language archetypes, which I call Dynamic Postures. In essence they represent four different energy states of the speaker. Adopting a particular Posture distinctively activates a set of gestures, movements, expressions and vocal variety through a change in physiology.

The four Dynamic Postures are: Thinker, Warrior, Lover and Child. Each of this posture has its own energy state. You would stand, move, breathe, look and speak to the audience differently for each set of posture. Each will impact the audience differently.

All of us have a preferred dominant posture, which we tend to use the most of, which then defines our speaking style. We will explore each one in turn. Along the way, I invite you to pause and reflect upon your own speaking style and determine which your preferred posture is.

Thinker (energy state: intellectual)
Imagine a college professor conducting a lecture giving you lots of facts. This imagery typifies the Thinker posture: Logical (conveying facts) rather than Emotional (expressing feelings), Calm (lower energy) rather than Excitable (higher energy), Passive (fixated at one spot having a monologue) rather than Active (physically reaching out into the audience space and having a height conversation with them).

Most of us would have come across such a presenter who logically gives us the facts, presents it at a low energy manner and stays within his own defined spatial zone rather than actively reaching over to the audience

THANK YOU

RINA FADZILA said...

NAME : RINA FADZILA BINTI RAMLI
ID : BHD 08-07-844
CLASS : HND 1(SEC3)

Thank you for your tips.After I read that tips, now I what the true body language.

Before this, sometimes I make body language mistake when I do my public speaking. At that time, I think I make the true body language because everyone know that body language very important when do public speaking.

With body language it can make us fill confidence and make audience attract with our text. Audience also not fill bored when heard our text.

I hope after this, I not do body language mistake again.

Nur Syafiqa said...

NAME: NUR SYAFIQA BINTI MOHD SHAHRUDDIN
ID: BHD08-07-759
SECTION: HND1(SEC4)

assalamualaikum.
thank you for your tips. here i want to share and add some information in body language elements.

Sometimes, we as a speaker do not remember some information that we want to share to the audience. so, we always use "word fillers" such as "um" and "ah". Our knowledge about the topic will go to waste if most of our sentences start with word fillers. Word fillers would oftentimes mean that we are not sure about what we are talking about or we haven’t prepared at all.

To prevent it, we can use examples in this category is “like” and “you know”. For example, “I was, like (or you know), trying to explain the significance of productivity but no one was listening.” Although we are trying to explain something important, the presence of “like” and “you know” will make our statement unimportant.

thank you.

hamimra said...

name:hamimra binti mohamad jali
class:section 2 HND 1
id:bhd0807823

salam madam
thank you fou our useful tips.

for me body language is one of the factors that will determine the success or failure of your speech. Aside from the actual speech, the audience will notice how your body moves as this is used to emphasize an idea.acial expressions, your hand movements and even the movements of your feet could be used on your speech so that you can effectively communicate to your audience.

Without any movement, your speech will be dull as you don’t offer any additional information to your audience. Standing in front of the pulpit or in front of the microphone without any hand gesture will most likely bore the audience.

but dont forget about Controlled Emotions

Too much of a good thing can go bad and that includes your body language during your public speech. Your body language could easily convey your emotions and let the audience know that the information you are talking about is important. But that doesn’t mean that you have to display emotions or frantically move your body in every point you are making. Too much movement will only distract your audience from your speech.

Control your emotions by using your hand gestures and other movements on certain parts of your speech. This will help boost some important points without creating too much distraction.


thank you

ina@gadis kampung said...

Name : NURAZLINA BT MOHD NOR
Id : BHD 08-07-837
Class : HND1/SECTION4

Assalamualaikum……

I already read your article. I always make this bad attitude when give a speech. Here, I want to share some common body language errors made by even seasoned presenters and how we can learn to avoid them when in front of a crowd.

1. Problem: Crossed Arms
Solution: Notice that you’re about to cross your arms, slowly allow them to fall comfortably next to you. If you’re restless, try holding on to the podium or table in front of you.

2. Not making eye contact
Solution : make certain to force yourself to make eye contact. Practice moving your gaze from one person to the next while you’re talking.

3. Showing no expression
Solution : rehearse in front of a mirror, paying special attention to facial expressions.

4. Wandering around the stage or room
Solution : have to be ultra-aware of where your feet are at all times, and may simply have to “plant” yourself in one spot for duration of your talk.

Hope this comment useful to everyone. Thank you.

diyla said...

NAME: NOOR FADILAH BT YUSOF
ID: BHD08-07-862
CLASS: HND1 SEC4

Assalamualaikum.

Body language can help in sending messages to the audience. Through this, the audience can feel us when we are happy, sad, angry, disgusted, silly and many more. However, body language can sometimes send the wrong message. When meeting new people it is important to present the right messages with your body language.

Some of common body language mistakes are below:

1) Misreading body language is a very common mistake and most of us do it at one time or another.

2) Most people perceive a lack of eye contact as a form of disinterest and even though you are interested in the other person, if you don't maintain eye contact, that person who is talking can misinterpret you and your speech will be boring.

3) Other than that is crossing the arms or placing something in front of you such as a book, chair, or other object.

4) Another form of body language is silliness. In fact, you might get glances of disgust from those around you.

5) Not smiling at new acquaintances is one of the mistakes. It is a guaranteed way to cause people to avoid you even though you may not truly mean anything behind it. If you do not smile, even a little, people will perceive you as unapproachable.

So, all of the above are my opinion and I shared it to all of you

Thank you

EJA said...

NAME: NURULIZZATI BINTI BURHAN
ID: BHD08-07-868
CLASS: HND1(SEC3)

Assalamualiakum,
Thank you for you post madam,When i stand infront of the audience, i always nervous. So, when it happen i will hold something, like a pen and i will play with the pen.I cannot control my nervous,even infornt of the people who i know. Besides, my body posture will change every second. This condition make me not comfortable to give a speech infront of audience.After i read this article, i hope i will avoid to do the same mistake.

Thank you..

azie said...

Name: Siti Nur Nazeha Bt Saiffuddin Zuhri
Id: Bhd08-07-817
Class: HND1/2

Assalamualaikum...

Madam, Thank you for your tips. It's help me a lot. I have a bad weakness, where i cant stand in front of the people where staring at me. I'll get nervous, and some times i will forget the speech that i had remeber before. From your tips, i hope that i can change my weakness and become more confidence in front of the audience. Thank you.

Nurul Ashikin bt Azizan said...

Nurul Ashikin Bt Azizan
Bhd08-07-798
Hnd1 Sec3

Thank you for this post.

After read the article of Public Speaking Body Language Mistakes ? Gestures, Movement, Posture & Facial Expressions, now i know how to prevent the body language mistake when give a speech.

We use body language to send messages to those around us. Body language can tell others when we are happy, sad, angry, disgusted, silly, flirtatious and more. However, body language can sometimes send the wrong message.

So here I want to share some another tips to make sure our speech is not a wrong message for public.

How to used the gestures,whether they come naturally to you or you have to work at them, gestures can help communicate your ideas and a little goes a long way. Use a variety of smooth, deliberate and natural gestures that support and visually illustrate your message.

You also should know what to do with your hands, begin with your hands in the usual position, hanging loosely at your sides, so they will be available for natural gestures.


Avoid hands in pockets especially for man since it can lead to a sloppier posture and slouching. You also may start jingling the change in your pocket without realizing it.

Remember,don't point at the audience because it's not polite to point. Lets ry an open-handed gesture instead.

Thanks all tips,I can share for this post..Thank you.

aisar said...

NIK AISAR NURLISA BT NIK AHMAD NIZAR
BHD 07-07-718
HND1(sEC 1)

After i read the article that you post, i know that starting now on, i need to be ready for my speech and be calm. Because if i can't calm and make my self nervous, all the tips that you have discuss i can't use. I totally agree about the tips that you discuss of because all the tips will help us to get more mark in our speech and it's also help us to be cool and give the speech gently.

And lastly i hope that i will give a good speech after this and make a good body language using your tips given.Thank you.

@sma_kh@l said...

NAME : HASMAH BINTI KHALID
ID : BHD08-07-869
CLASS : HND1 SEC 3

Assalamualaikum..

As we know, we use body language to send message to those around us. So, i want to tell you the best way how to prevent some of these mistakes.

1) Facial expressions
If you smile before you speak, you give your listener the impression that you are confident and looking forward to speaking. Don;t fake a big politician-type smile! A small, natural smile will be fine. A small is a good way to establish rapport with your audience and to help put both you and your audience at ease. Other facial expression can be used to convey different emotions.

2)Movement
Listener find it extreamly distracting to watch speaker nervously twirl strands of hair with their fingers, fiddle with earings, necklaces or other items of jewelry or constantly push slipping eyeglasses up on their noses. If you have long hair, tie it back during your presentation so you won't be tempted to play with it or to fling it away from your face. tTry to keep jewelry to a minimum, and if you wear glasses, make sure it fit properly.

While speaking, don't hide your hand in your pocket and jingle your keys or loose change. keep your hands at your sides. On other hand, don't stand "frozen" in one place for your entire speech.If you're nervous, take a few steps to your right or left while speaking.

Thank you..

Sazarina Sejali said...

Name : SAZARINA BT SEJALI
ID No : BHD 08-07-839
Sec : HND1 (Sec 2)

I have read this article. Like we know, gesture is an easy way method to use to make our speech become a good speech. Besides, it is an easy way to apply too. Here is some tips on how to use gesture for a powerful speech.

Harness the Power of Gestures

Gestures include your posture, the movement of your eyes, hands, face, arms and head, as well as your entire body. They help to support or reinforce a particular thought or emotion. If our gestures support our statements, we are communicating with a second sense. People tend to understand and remember messages better when more than one sense is reached.

The reason of using appropriate gestures is so critical to your presentation is that communication does not just consist of words. Less than 10% of the words we use in speaking gets through to others. On the other hand, over 55% of our body language is communicated to others very clearly.

Make the Most Out of Movements

People will begin to make judgments about you as soon as you stand up. The time to begin using effective body movements is when you walk to your position in front of a group. Stand up tall and walk with a strong posture. Let your body communicate that you have something important to say and the audience needs to hear it. If your posture is slouched, they will feel that you aren’t convinced about your message and they will begin doubting you before you have uttered a single word.

When you get to the front, take a deep breath, calmly look at your entire audience and smile. One of the biggest mistakes presenters make is to begin talking as soon as they get up to the front, or even worse, as they are walking there. When you take time to look at your audience before you speak, you begin to establish that critical connection with them. You also give the audience sufficient time to focus on you and what you are about to say.

Look directly at the faces of your audience members, not over their heads. Eye contact is one of the most important aspects of speaking. An easy way to get over stage fright is to look at the faces of individual audience members and just talk to that one person instead of the entire audience. Rotate the people you talk to – someone on the left, someone towards the middle, a person on the right, someone in the front, etc. This will help you maintain rapport with the entire group, while allowing you to feel at ease.

A further advantage of maintaining good eye contact is that it will help you gauge how your message is coming across to the group. If you are trying to explain something and members of the audience give you blank stares, then you need to adjust your words so they can better understand you.

Practice Makes Natural

A good way to be comfortable with gestures is to know your speech well. Several of the most outstanding speakers offer the same piece of advice: "The key to effectively using gestures is to know your material so well, to be so well prepared, that your gestures will flow naturally." Practice your speech and know it well so that you can enjoy sharing your message with others.

Become a master at using your body to support your words. Have fun with gestures, be yourself, and you will certainly present your message with power and confident.

dAk said...

Name : Maisarah bt Abdul Rahman
Class : HND 1 (Section 2)
ID : BHD08-07-812

Assalammualaikum madam,

I have read about your post and I would like to give some info about posture. One of thing that we should do when start the speech is to have good posture. Posture is the main point and it really important to show that we are prepared to giving speech. Also, posture makes us more relaxes when doing speech. There is some specific thing that you should alert when you stand. Do to stand correctly? Well, you should see how your shoulders, neck, jaw and also feel your spine. It is in good condition and are you feel comfortable with this situation? How actually good posture when stand?
Imagine, imagine that there is a golden thread attached to the top of your head, towards the back and that some unseen force above you is pulling it upwards. This will ensure that your spine is fully extended so that your head is not slumped into your shoulders. Your arms should be hanging as loosely as possible. Their natural position is hanging slightly forward from the shoulders. Now, see at the mirror. Look to your shoulders, neck, and jaw.

Shoulders:

Still standing in your centered position, lift the shoulders right up to the ears and then allow them to drop with their own weight back into position. Make sure you do let them drop and don't actually place them back in position as your muscles will then immediately tense up again. Circle your shoulders gently three times forward and then three times back. Always do all these exercises gently. This is not "keep fit". Hold your right arm out to the front with the palm facing downwards. Gently swing it up and over in an arc until you end up with your arm out in front of you again, but with the palm facing up. Swing it down and back and over, ending with the palm facing back down again. Do this several times with each arm.

Neck:

To loosen up the neck, stand in your centered position, turn your head until your chin is above your right shoulder. Gently drop it down till it touches your chest and continue to roll it across the chest to the other shoulder and lift the head up again so that is facing in the opposite direction to the one it started in. Repeat in the other direction. Do this several times. If you're a bit stiff in that area you may hear bumps and clicks. Don't worry, just make sure you are doing the exercise gently. This stiffness will improve the more you do this exercise.

Jaw:

Remember, always treat the jaw gently. It's a very vulnerable joint if it's misused.

First, I want you to imagine that you are chewing a particularly sticky toffee. Really work the jaw and the tongue in a chewing motion. Make sure you are using a circular motion. Never swing the jaw from side to side. You are likely to hear a nasty click and end up with a dislocation.

Next, I want you to yawn, and have a good stretch whilst you're at it, just as you would if you'd just got out of bed.

Spine:

Think about your spine. Stand with your feet together. Bend your knees and start circling them round, keeping your feet still, first in one direction, and then the other. Now take the circling motion up to the hips and circle them. First one way and then the other, then up to the torso and shoulders. With knees slightly bent, undulate the spine, like a snake. This does take a bit of practice.

So, with this info about having good posture when standing, I hope people will learn how to stand correctly when doing a speech.

Thank you.

NiNa said...

NAME : NUR AMANINA BT ABD GHAFAR
ID : BHD 08 07 814
CLASS : HND 1 SEC 2

Here some information how to improve public speaking body language mistakes.

1)Remove "Noisy" body movements from your presentation.

For many people, there is as much to be gained from removing nervous and distracting movements as there is from adding conscious gestures. It may seem counter-intuitive, but this is "addition by subtraction."

Before delivering this speech, ask a friend to highlight your most distracting physical mannerism. We all have one. It might be playing with your keys or coins in your pocket. It might be rocking back and forth from your heel to your toe.

Whatever it is, make a goal in this speech to consciously remove or reduce it in this speech project. By doing so, you can clear your physical palette, and then you'll be ready for purpose additions of gestures to complement your message.

2)Avoid "Forcing" unnatural body movements into your speech

One common mistake I see in speaking is to awkwardly force a hand gesture into nearly every sentence. This almost always results in a very choppy and awkward delivery.

Remember that your goal is not to provide a continuous physical interpretation of every word spoken. Instead, add gestures selectively where they add the most impact.

I find that the best way to avoid forcing hand and arms gestures is to try to strike an even balance between the other forms of physical gestures - eye contact, facial expressions, posture, or whole body movements. For example, if you convey an important emotion with your facial expression, your arms can relax to your sides because they "aren't needed."

3)Record a video of yourself speaking or making a presentation

If you have not seen yourself speaking yet, use this project as the motivation to finally do it. The best way to discover any distracting movements is to watch yourself delivering a speech with the volume turned off.

Atiqah said...

NAME : NUR ATIQAH BT YAACOB
ID : BHD 08 07 771
CLASS : HND 1 SEC 4


Posture

Make sure you are standing up straight and are facing your audience head-on. Keep your posture open with arms relaxed and hanging down at your sides. If your hands are clasped firmly in front of you, your feet are crossed and your body is tight -- you are not exactly exuding confidence. Other "don'ts" include:
• hands on hips -- you look too condescending or parental
• crossed arms -- you are not conveying a look that says, "Let's talk."
• hands crossed in front of you - otherwise known as the "figleaf" stance, this makes you look weak and timid.
• hands joined behind your back -- this stance (the "parade rest") makes you seem like you have no energy
• leaning back in a chair, if seated -- you look like you're ready to pass judgement
• putting your hands in your pockets -- this makes you seem nervous and can result in jingling any change or keys that might be there
Gestures

Gestures are in important part of your visual picture. They are reinforcements of the words and ideas you are trying to convey. Gestures include hand, arm and head movements.

We all know people who "talk with their hands" -- in some cultures gesticulating a great deal is the norm.

Two gestures to avoid are:
• using a pointed finger -- this makes you look accusatory, even if that wasn't your intent
• fist raising -- this is hostile or threatening

The most effective gestures are spontaneous. They come from what you are thinking and feeling, and help your listeners relate to you and what you are telling them.

When giving a presentation, make sure you vary your gestures. Don't use the same motion over and over again. Audience members will focus on the repeated gesture and not your content. Use your palms and open them out to your audience when gesturing. Move your arm and hand as a single unit, gesturing up and down. When gesturing, always keep your hands and gestures above your waist.

Eye contact
If you make eye contact with someone who quickly looks away, try not to directly look into that person's eyes again. In some culture direct eye contact is inappropriate, and some people just feel uncomfortable. If you are giving a presentation to a group of people, the eye contact should be done in an irregular and unpredictable "Z" formation - looking at one person for three to five seconds and then moving on to next face.

The possible problem area with eye contact is if you over do it, and start to stare. In conjunction with making eye contact, you can nod your head occasionally. This also helps connect with your listener.

Facial expressions
Be aware of your facial expressions. If possible, look at a mirror each time you are on the phone -- do this for one week. Watch your face when you are talking on the phone.

Be aware of any artificial, unfriendly, or deadpan expressions you may be making. Do you squint, frown, make strange faces? Once you are aware of any expressions you may make, it will be easier to eliminate them. Practice smiling and looking pleasant. That's how you want to look when meeting clients or prospects.

Some facial expression "don'ts" include:
• arching eyebrows -- this makes you seem surprised or questioning
• frowning -- your moodiness will be the only thing the other person remembers
• grimacing -- your prospect will wonder where it hurts

jasz said...

NAME :JASRUL ADZLI BIN MOHAMMAD
ID : BHD 07-07-681
CLASS : HND 1(1)

A bad posture when present a speech can distract audience and will damaged all over your speech.So I want to share a article that explain about hand gesture that will help us to communicate to the audience.

Experts tell us body language accounts for between 55% and 65% of our communication. Just what is body language? It is carriage, facial expressions, eye contact and gestures. All go into establishing your presence and making a connection with the audience. Gestures can be made with your hands, arms, shoulder, torso, legs, feet or a combination of these but hand gestures are probably the most common.

When you are preparing a speech, what proportion of time and effort do you give to the movement and cadence of your hands? If you are like most people, the answer is not much. Yet appropriate use of your hands canb result in a marked increase in the understanding and retention of your message. Correctly used, hand gestures can help you say more in less time, show what you mean without having to resort to visuals, signal your conviction and confidence and add texture and dimension to your material and ideas.

Avoid holding your notes in your hands since this effectively immobilizes them. If you are nervous about your about your presentation, stands with your hands relaxed at your sides. Stage fright closes down normal muscle coordination. Avoid making the audience nervous with gestures that reveal anxiety such as gripping the lectern, clenching your hands together, clutching an object, fiddling with clothing or accessories or touching a body part (pulling ear, wiping brow, rubbing chin).

Once you have learned to relax in front of an audience, hand gestures can be used to emphasize the stucture of your presentation. This represents the best use of hand gestures and you should avoid using gestures as decorations. Begin by using your hands to illustrate your enthusiasm for being there. You can accentuate your point of view with a solid, intentional gesture and emphasize main points with deliberate gestures. Use your hands to indicate a new topic or transition with a forward or open gesture. Finally, signal the ending with a gesture indicating closure or departure.

You can also use hand gestures to enhance your presentation by using them to respond to audience input with affirmative or encompassing gestures. Introduce humor by contradiction between your gestures and your words. Where appropriate look for opportunites to use your hands to express emotion or attitude, emphasize importance, demonstrate relationship or contrast, show shape, direction or location and signal recognition, acceptance, departure, or approval.

thank you..

loseresol halimunan said...

NAME : NURAFIFAH BT ZAINOL ABIDIN
ID : BHD08-07-815
CLASS : HND1 SECTION 2

Salam madam,
I had read your post about “Public Speaking Body Language Mistakes? Gestures, Movement, Posture & Facial Expressions” and this post are quite interesting to follow. It is because I’ve learn how to avoid myself from being careless when deliver speeches.

We don’t realize our careless mistakes because it has been our habits when feeling anxious. For example, gesture mistake - me myself always hiding my hand in my pockets so that people won’t recognize my shaking hand. But that’s not the way because it will make me look like a coward.

Then I do always look people gripping the podium tightly when they feel anxious. It’s quite funny sometimes because the function of the podium is to accompany them. Huhuu.

My habit when I need to present in front audience is keep moving without purpose automatically. I also like to hiding behind a desk, podium or flipchart because for me people won’t recognize my careless mistakes. But after read your post I know that this is the one of the public speaking language mistakes and make me beware from now.

Slouching and keeping the head down is the most favorite thing that speaker always do when need to speak in front audience. Facial expression is also important for the speaker to attract audience to listen for the speeches. So we must know how to express it and make sure that audience hasn’t misunderstood with what we trying to say.

So that, I want to thanks to madam because you have post this topic to make sure that speaker won’t make this careless mistakes always. That’s all..~

khairul said...

NAME : MOHD KHAIRUL ANUAR BIN RAMLEE
ID : BHD 08-07-870
CLASS : HND1 (SEC4)

Assalamualaikum

here i want to add some common mistake that always happen. Our voice has the ability to convey an incredible range of meaning and emotion when presenting. It s an important part of your non verbal communications, or body language, and can help you can communicate your message clearly and effectively to your audience.

Avoid these five common mistakes in order to tap into the full power of your voice:

1. Speaking Too Fast

How fast is too fast? It depends. You have to speak slowly enough so you can enunciate your words and the audience can understand you. Slow down even more if you are speaking in a language that is not native to the audience or if you are presenting new, complex information. Your rate tends to increase when you are nervous, so be aware of your nerves.

2. Speaking Nonstop

Speaking nonstop means that you will run out of breath by the end of the sentence and your voice will sound strangled as it trails off. Instead, use pauses to catch your breath and give your audience a chance to catch up. You can also pause before an important word to clue the audience that they should pay attention; for example, the results this year have been [pause]… excellent. Pausing to take a breath also means you are less likely to use pause words like um and ah.

3. Speaking Too Softly

How soft is too soft? If your audience has to struggle to hear you that mean you are speaking too softly. You also need to speak more loudly than usual if you are in a large room or any size room with poor acoustics. If you have the opportunity to use a microphone, use it. As long as it is working properly, a microphone can make it easier for the audience to hear you. As you increase your volume, it may feel like you re shouting. Chances are, you are not, but to be sure, you can record yourself or ask an audience member for an honest assessment of your volume.

4. Speaking in a Monotone

A monotone robs your voice of inflection and does not allow you to emphasize different words and emotions. Using inflection in your voice can convey your precise meaning to the audience. For example, your voice inflection can convey the difference between these two sentences I love Brussels sprouts! (bring me a big plate of them!) and I love Brussels sprouts? (are you kidding? I hate them!)

5. Speaking in a Tone that Does Not Match Your Words

As with all other elements of non verbal communications, your voice should match the words that you are saying. If you say I know this is going to be a great conference, but your voice conveys boredom or sarcasm, the audience will believe your non verbal rather than your words.

If you avoid these five common voice mistakes, you’ll be able to harness the power of your voice so that you can connect to your audience and communicate your meaning effectively.

Nurul Syazwani bt Malek said...

NAME:NURUL SYAZWANI BT MALEK
ID:BHD08-07-834
CLASS:HND1 SEC2

Firstly our body language, is an important part of public speaking. Your body language includes your posture, movement, gestures, facial expressions, eye contact and voice. Here are the most common gesture, movement, posture and facial expression mistakes:

GESTURE MISTAKES. Do not keep your hands locked at your sides, you will look nervous and your presentation will lack. Keep your hand in your pockets. This position leads down the slippery slope to slouching and a sloppier posture.

MOVEMENT MISTAKES. Most of the time you should stand confidently in one place rather than pacing back and forth or walking aimlessly. If you do need to move, it should have a purpose. For example, walk confidently to the front of the room before you begin speaking and walk with purpose to the audience.

POSTURE MISTAKES. You should stand up straight but it should be natural, not like you are robot want to get attention. Keep your shoulders back and hold your head up so you can make eye contact. This posture conveys confidence and helps you breathe more fully. Slouching and keeping your head down. Not only does it prevent you from looking at the audience, but it also conveys nervousness and makes it harder for the audience to hear you.

FACIAL EXPRESSION MISTAKES. For example unless you are delivering horrible news, it is appropriate for you to smile, even in a business setting. Smiling will relax you and, in turn, relax the audience. Smiling too much especially when delivering bad news. For example, your audience will interpret it as a sign of your lack of concern. If you eliminate these body language mistakes from your presentation, you'll come across as more confident and sincere and you'll be able to communicate more effectively.

zaRina.. said...

NAME : NUR ZARINA BT MOHD ARIFFIN
ID : BHD08-07-836
CLASS : HND1 SECTION 2

Assalamulaikum to Madam Mimi..

Firstly,thank you for your post above about Public Speaking Body Language Mistakes ? Gestures, Movement, Posture & Facial Expressions. Non-verbal communication, or body language, is an important part of public speaking. Your body language includes your posture, movement, gestures, facial expressions, eye contact and voice. At the very last, your body language should not distract the audience and with a little practice, it can help you convey confidence and help the audience see your message more clearly. So you're trying to improve your public speaking with your body language.

Is your body dead when you speak, or does your constant motion give your audience headaches?

Does your face signal fear or does it signal excitement for your topic?

Do your hands vibrate, or do they punctuate your words?

Good body language allows your movements to enhance your speech rather than detract from it. This article examines the primary goals of a speaking presentation and provides tips and techniques for improvement.

Step 1
Remove "Noisy" body movements from your presentation.

For many people, there is as much to be gained from removing nervous and distracting movements as there is from adding conscious gestures. It may seem counter-intuitive, but this is "addition by subtraction."

Before delivering this speech, ask a friend to highlight your most distracting physical mannerism. We all have one. It might be playing with your keys or coins in your pocket. It might be rocking back and forth from your heel to your toe.

Whatever it is, make a goal in this speech to consciously remove or reduce it in this speech project. By doing so, you can clear your physical palette, and then you'll be ready for purpose additions of gestures to complement your message.

Step 2
Avoid "Forcing" unnatural body movements into your speech

One common mistake I see in speaking is to awkwardly force a hand gesture into nearly every sentence. This almost always results in a very choppy and awkward delivery.

Remember that your goal is not to provide a continuous physical interpretation of every word spoken. Instead, add gestures selectively where they add the most impact.

I find that the best way to avoid forcing hand and arms gestures is to try to strike an even balance between the other forms of physical gestures - eye contact, facial expressions, posture, or whole body movements. For example, if you convey an important emotion with your facial expression, your arms can relax to your sides because they "aren't needed."

Step 3
Record a video of yourself speaking or making a presentation

If you have not seen yourself speaking yet, use this project as the motivation to finally do it. The best way to discover any distracting movements is to watch yourself delivering a speech with the volume turned off.

mariyam said...

NAME SITI MARIYAM ABU BAKAR
ID BHD 08-07-851
SECTION HND1 SEC3

Assalamualiakum
Thank you for the usefull list about the bosy language and posture mistakes. it really helpfull because before this i always to the mistakes because i very nervours and not confident and i also not really know my body language is wrong so, hopefully it can help me.
but sometimes if we not depent on something the audience can know we are nervous. so i want to share, if we want to give a speech we can hold something like pen or eraser but make sure not a large thing like paer because if the audience can see the paper is vibrate a lot so they can know we are in nervours and can be the laugh material to them. hopefully it will be help.
Thank you.

azie said...

NAME : NURAZIEMAH ASMADI
ID : BHD 08-07-856
CLASS : HND1(SECTION 3)

Thanks madam for the tips.I also have this mistake when giving speech.I hope this tips will help me soon.

Here are 5 Simple Body Language Mistakes To Avoid :

It shouldn’t come as a surprise to you that good body postures make good impression. And since I realize that some may find it hard to master the art, I have compiled some simple mistakes that you can avoid. Worry not. This should be a walk in a park for everyone. Enjoy.

1. Gloomy – Leave the house with a smile. It will do you wonders.

2. Crossing arms – Crossing hands makes you unapproachable and appears unfriendly. If I were you, I’ll simply avoid crossing arms altogether when I’m outside of the house. *hint*

3. Not paying attention – If you don’t pay attention, it will show. This also means that as long as you pay attention, your body language would do great. Yep, it’s that simple.

4. Standing too close – Everyone has a personal space of their own, and they don’t expect people to invade it. Unless there’s some chemistry going on, try not to stand too close to another.

5. Leaning backward – Is bad. It gives a sense that you are rejecting the other person, or simply not paying attention, even if that is not the case. The next time you go out, try to sit straight. It’s a good habit to instill.

Thank you.

Sharulazwan said...

Name: MOAHAMAD SHARULAZWAN BIN SHARUDIN
ID: BHD 08-08-805
Section: HND 1 (1)

salam madam....

if we can see the body languages when we speaking is good to improve ourself...

this video is a tips for body languages..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmjGz4PS6sI&feature=PlayList&p=CBC9B0E3479C39F4&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=44

and this video is for we can see a mistakes body languages....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSuVCcUkDAY&feature=PlayList&p=CBC9B0E3479C39F4&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=34

Emy[ motmot ] said...

NAME : NUR AMILIAH BT RAHIM
ID : BHD08-07-757
SECTION : HND1(1)

Salam Pn Mimi.

Body language is very importand when you make a speech.

Firstly,eye contact is crucial for communication. Depending on cultural region and possibly social status, eye contact communicates a wealth of information. For instance, in some countries it is wrong to stare anywhere but the ground if a
person is talking to a superior or boss.

Next, pay attention to the angle of your body when you try to convince the audience about the contents of your speech topics. This gives others a clue into how you feel about them. This includes the angle of the points of our shoes, and how we face our bodies.

Other than that, your hands, arms, and legs play the next biggest role.
There are many hand gestures to use as speech language. While you could make the study of hand gestures a project later on, now it is optimal that you just try to use hand gestures that naturally come to mind. Relate messages when you talk to those you're very close to.

Besides, your facial expressions speak louder than your words. Be aware of eye and eye brow movements at all times. The wrong twitch and we can convey anger or hatred. However, raised eye brows, a slight smile, and tightening of the facial muscles can convey interest and pleasure. Spend a few moments in front of the mirror practicing different types of smiles. Some smiles convey happiness and interest, while others may seem fake of off-putting.

Thank you.

~eada~ said...

Name : Nurul Aida Bt. Mohd Bisri
Id : Bhd 08 07 773
Section : hnd1 (section 1)

Thank you for your good article madam. Here, i want to share a tips to overcome body language mistakes.

1. When you notice that you're about to cross your arms (or have already done so), slowly allow them to fall comfortably next to you. If you're restless, try holding on to the podium or table in front of you, thereby giving your limbs something to do.

2. Whenever you speak with another person, make certain to force yourself to make eye contact. If you're at a party and are standing in a small group of 3-4 people, practice moving your gaze from one person to the next while you're talking. Eventually, this will become more natural and will not feel forced when you're making speeches.

3. Before give a speech, rehearse in front of a mirror, paying special attention to your facial expressions. Are you smiling? Do you seem approachable, believable and friendly? Are you sending the right message with your eyes, mouth and eyebrows? As you become more comfortable allowing yourself to show emotions, your speeches will be stronger and better received.

That all from me. Thank You..

Zul said...

NAME: NURAZIZUL BIN ABU BAKAR
ID: BHD08-07-863
CLASS: HND1(SEC1)

AssalamualAikum,
Thank you for you post madam.
I want to share tips for successfull nonverbal-communication..

First:Take a time out if you’re feeling overwhelmed by stress. Stress compromises your ability to communicate. When you’re stressed out, you’re more likely to misread other people, send off confusing or off-putting nonverbal signals, and lapse into unhealthy knee-jerk patterns of behavior. Take a moment to calm down before you jump back into the conversation. Once you’ve regained your emotional equilibrium, you’ll be better equipped to deal with the situation in a positive way.

Second:Pay attention to inconsistencies. Nonverbal communication should reinforce what is being said. If you get the feeling that someone isn’t being honest or that something is “off,” you may be picking up on a mismatch between verbal and nonverbal cues. Is the person is saying one thing, and their body language something else? For example, are they telling you “yes” while shaking their head no?

Third:Look at nonverbal communication signals as a group. Don’t read too much into a single gesture or nonverbal cue. Consider all of the nonverbal signals you are sending and receiving, from eye contact to tone of voice and body language. Are your nonverbal cues consistent—or inconsistent—with what you are trying to communicate?

Thank you...

noor amirah azhar said...

NAME : NOOR AMIRAH BT AZHAR
ID : BHD 08-07-756
CLASS : HND 1 ( SEC A)

Salam madams..

Thank you madam for sharing this article. Here, I want to share some information on public speaking body language mistakes.

FACIAL EXPRESSION MISTAKES
1. Not smiling, ever. Unless you are delivering horrible news, it is appropriate for you to smile, even in a business setting. Smiling will relax you and, in turn, relax the audience.

2. Smiling too much, especially when delivering bad news. You may be smiling or even giggling because you are very nervous, but it undermines the seriousness of your message and your sincerity. If you smile broadly or giggle while announcing mass layoffs, for example, your audience will interpret it as a sign of your lack of concern.

GESTURE MISTAKES

1. Not using gestures at all. If you keep your hands locked at your sides, you will look nervous and your presentation will lack the visual element to accompany and enhance your words.

2. Keeping your hand in your pockets. This position leads down the slippery slope to slouching and a sloppier posture. And you also may unconsciously start playing with the keys or change in your pocket.

POSTURE MISTAKES
1. Standing too stiffly. Yes, you should stand up straight but it should be natural, not like you are frozen at attention. Keep your shoulders back and hold your head up so you can make eye contact. This posture conveys confidence and helps you breathe more fully.

2. Slouching and keeping your head down. Not only does it prevent you from looking at the audience, but it also conveys nervousness and makes it harder for the audience to hear you.

That all, thank you

diyla said...

NAME: NOOR FADILAH BT YUSOF
ID: BHD08-07-862
CLASS: HND1 SEC4

Assalmualaikum. Here I want to share some tips on how to avoid those things.

1)Posture

Posture is another major physical aspect of public speaking. How you carry yourself affects the audience's opinion of you.

When you speak, make sure you stand up straight, but not rigid. It's never a good idea to shift your weight from one foot to the other, and try not to cross and uncross your legs. Also, make an effort not to lean forward onto the desk or podium. Just take time to make yourself comfortable before a speech. You can make yourself comfortable by breathing naturally and standing with your feet roughly shoulder-length apart.

Your posture should say, "Dog gone-it, I'm stable" and "By Job, I'm assured." The trick of it is, you should be relaxed without looking sloppy. If you can hack it, your speech will improve that much more.

2)Gestures

Gestures are equally important in the physical presentation of your speech. Gestures are the movements of your hands and arms during your speech and they're used to emphasize your ideas.

Incorporating gestures into a speech is sometimes a problem for speakers. Speakers are usually pretty conscious of their hands. A lot of the time they have no idea what to do with them. Fidgeting, clenching your fists, and any other unintentional hand motions will do nothing but distract the audience from your speech.

Well-timed, well-conceived hand gestures, on the other hand, can really enhance a speech.

3)Facial Expressions

Facial expressions can either enforce a message or undermine it. If you're talking about something sad, you want to look sad. If you're talking about something frustrating, you want to look angry. And if you're talking about how great celery is, you're going to want to convey a look that says, "Hey, I enjoy celery!"

In any case, you want to make sure that your facial expressions are appropriate to the subject matter of your speech. Somebody who smiles all the way through a serious speech will lose her credibility real quick.

One really important point to remember about facial expression is that eye contact is extremely essential.

In mainstream American culture, somebody who's unable to look a person in the eye is perceived as having something to hide. These people usually earn the nicknames "shifty," "weasel," and "eight-fingered Louie."

Also, speakers who don't look at the audience can't see how the audience is reacting. The audience's facial expressions can give clues about what interests them in a speech and what doesn't. This feedback can help you adjust the speech to their needs.

But if you try to make eye contact with everyone in the room, you'll look like a jack rabbit with a nervous tic. Your best bet is to mentally divide the room into three or four parts and shift your focus between these areas. This way, every listener will feel like you're directly talking to him or her.


Well, that just about some tips on how to avoid all the mistakes. We learned all the ins and outs of giving a great speech. Practice them well and, during your next speech, the audience just might fall down at your feet.

Thank you

as said...

NAME : ASMAR NAJWA BINTI MUHAMMAD NOR

ID : BHD08-07-763

CLASS : HND 1 (1)

Assalamualaikum Pn Mimi and all here..

May be some of us are bored to read to get the tips about how to get the correct posture, gesture and facial expression. So here I have video to share with all of you how to get the correct posture and gesture.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS3BDGNDu_8

This video will show you how to get the correct facial expression when giving a speech and easy for you to understand.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1H2kZWjqTA

Hopefully by watching this video, we can give the correct posture, gesture and facial expression while giving a speech.

..bOoLat.. said...

Name : Faten Hannani Binti Mohd Isa
Id : BHD 08-07-758
Class : HND 1 (Section 1)

Assalamualaikum Madam,

I would like to share one of the public speaking body language mistakes which is gesture and how to improve it. It should always be borne in mind that gesture means the action of the whole body. It does not mean simply movement of the arm and hand. This change or movement may, from the strength of the feeling that prompts it, extend to the arm and hand.

But this latter movement, in arm and hand is only the fuller manifestation of one's thought or feeling(the completion of the gesture not the gesture itself). Arm movement when not preceded or supplemented by body movement or body pose is obtrusive action. It brings a member of the body into noticeable prominence, attracting the auditor's eye and taking his mind from the speaker's thought.

The amount of gesture of course determined by the temperament of the speaker, the nature of the speech, the character of the audience and the occasion of the address.

Thank you.

Skyjuice said...

NAME : NUR IFFA AQWA BINTI ZAWAWI
ID : BHD08-07-765
CLASS : HND 1 (SECTION 1)

Assalamualaikum to Madam Mimi...

To speak in front of crowds is not an easy because the nervousness will influenced our self and of course it will tend to do a lot of mistakes during giving a speech.

here I would like to give my own opinion regarding why the facial expressions is one of the significant elements in public speaking.

From my own opinion, our facial expressions express about what we feel during that particular moment. Sometimes, we cannot hide what we feel because the feeling have been expressed by our face. During giving a speech, to make our self more confident in front of crowd, we have to first smile, as the way we greet our audience. but, do not smile all along the speech because it can be bit annoying to the audience. Do not smile when the content of the speech is not funny or have sense of humor.

Facial expressions will help a lot especially when we giving a persuasive speech where we want to attract audience attention. The way we giving the attention getter. Audience will be more interested when we trying so hard to expresses our feeling through the speech.

Hope that my opinion is acceptable...

have a nice day!Thank you.....

Share^Rough said...

NAME : MUHAMAD SYARAFUDDIN HILMI BIN ISMAIL
ID : BHD08-07-794
CLASS : HND 1 (SECTION 4)

Assalamualaikum Pn Mimi, from what i read at the topic right there about common public speaking body language mistake made by public speaker, and i agreed with all the point that been brought up. From what i see this mistake commonly being made because of nervousness and lack of confident in giving public speaking or speech and here i would like to add more point about the commonly mistake being made while giving public speaking and some solution that could help to overcome or prevent this mistake.

- Swaying to and fro in front of the audience
- Hanging on to the podium
- Finger tapping
- Licking your lips or biting your lips
- Fidgeting with clothes, pockets or jewelry
- Frowning
- Fussing with hair
- Bobbing your head
- Flailing arms at inappropriate times

The movements you make in your speech should be planned or at least controlled by you. Any movement that is not planned could potentially be distracting. Many of the above mentioned mannerisms stem from being nervous about being on stage. Additionally, they could also come just because you don’t know you are doing them. Either way, you’ll need to minimize and eliminate as many of these movements as possible.

1. Make a video tape of yourself. Do you even know that you are making these movements? Probably not. A video will help you identify which distracting movements you’ll need to work on eliminating.

2. Review your video tape for places where you make distracting mannerisms. Make a list of the mannerisms you have and thoughtfully practice your speech without those mannerisms. Rerecord yourself and keep reviewing your tapes until you a satisfied that all the mannerisms are gone.

3. Work on feeling comfortable with delivering your speech. You should feel natural as you speak about your topic. You should feel like you are sharing information with a long time friend. This will come when you’ve spent many hours practicing, reworking and revising your speech. This will also come because you speak from your heart and let others know the way you feel about your subject.

4. Work on eliminating nervousness when delivering your speech. This will come as you get more familiar with your material. This will also come as you take the time to focus on delivering your message instead of focusing on the feelings of fear and anxiety.

5. You can also review your video tapes for place in your speech that you need to add body movements into your presentation that will make it more interesting. Let your movements show the way you feel. These movements should be natural and can work in your favor as you emphasize specific points in your presentation.

6. Consider this when deciding which body movements to incorporate into your presentation. Body movements should look natural. You can use facial expressions and make eye contact with your audience for maximum effects.

Every movement should be planned during your presentation. You can easily lose your audience with distracting movements because your audience’s focus and attention will be turned to these movements instead of what you have to say!

That's all mistake and tips that i can suggest to overcome this problem thank you!!

Farhana Awang said...

NAME : FARHANA BT AWANG
CLASS : HND1 SECTION 3
ID : BHD 08-07-843

Assalamualaikum pn mimi, from what i had read from your article, i was absolutely agreed because body posture was very important when we give a speech. from your article, i finally realize that they are so many mistake that i have made when i give a speech. from that article, i found the mistake that i always make which is holding hands behind my backs, moving without purpose and mostly is shifting from my weight from one foot to the other.
thank to madam mimi because make this article, and i have some example of body language for additional information :

Body language

* Don’t smile so much. People take smiling as a sign of warmth but also a sign of emotional involvement. The more distant you are, the harder it is for someone to disregard you.
* Look them in the eye. This shows confidence and makes the other person know you mean business.
* Don’t look down. People believe that if you are looking down you don’t know what you’re talking about. They might also think you are lying. Fight the urge to look at your feet and look into the other person’s eyes instead.
* Show less emotion. The less emotion you show the more people are likely to really listen. Now, this isn’t to say that you shouldn’t be passionate. Just don’t get crazy excited like Howard Dean. Instead, use your passion to fuel your speech.
* Don’t blink so much. Next time you’re watching a movie during a serious scene, watch the actor’s eyes. If they are good, you will notice they barely blink, if at all. The more people can see your eyes the more sincere they believe you to be.

Mohd Aizudin said...

Mohd Aizudin bin Jamalan
BHD08-07-832
HND 1 section 2

Assalamualaikum Pn Emilia

Gestures are icing on the cake of public speaking. Gestures when your on a podium in front of an audience make you come alive. The larger the audience, the more alive you look. They can emphasize what you say. They can also describe what you say. In public speaking, there are two ways mannerisms are of concern. The first is gestures that become mannerisms and the second is the particular way of speaking, mode of behavior or way of thought. I will only discuss about gestures that become mannerisms when give a speech. When a gesture becomes the exact same repeated motion it becomes a mannerism.Public speaking mannerisms are very annoying for an audience. It serves no useful purpose. Perhaps most of all, it means your out of control. If you give into mannerisms, it can often be from nervousness. If your hand, face and body gestures are not emphatic or descriptive, if they are repetitive of the same motion, then they are mannerisms. Only be becoming aware of them can you eliminate them. Once aware, then you have to want to. Or, you can take your chances on having your own trademark. Many times we are not aware of our mannerisms. If this is the case, have someone in the audience watch you. Better yet, have someone video tape you and watch yourself.

m@nz said...

NAME: LUQMANUL HAKIM BIN AHMAD ABDILLAH
ID: BHD08-01-743
CLASS: HND1 SECTION4

Assalamualaikum Madam..

Thanks for information that you give. It is very important to me to improve my public speaking skills. Here, I want share all of you about a top 5 mistakes speakers make while on stage.


Mistake 1: Rambling
Plan your presentation. Have a clear and focused goal and point of your speech. Follow it. Help your audience follow you.

Mistake 2: Too-Crowded Visuals
Don't write every word of your speech on a Power Point Presentation and call that a visual aid. It's a crutch for you and difficult on the audience. You're better off without it.

Mistake 3: Using Filler Words
A presentation should feel like a conversation with your audience, yes, but there are a few things that may be acceptable in one to one conversation that you should avoid in a speech. Filler words like "you know" don't do much to enhance a conversation in general, but truly don't belong in any speech.

Mistake 4: Being Too Casual
Some people downplay the importance of dressing the part of a successful professional. However it is appropriate to follow through on your branding. For example my friend, Carrie Wilkerson, calls herself the "Barefoot Executive" so when she kicks off her shoes during a presentation that works for her.

Mistake 5: Not Having ANY Offer
Not every speech should have the purpose of selling something, but it's a mistake to leave the stage without offering your audience reason for them to stay engaged and allow you to follow up with them after the event has ended.

Thank You

Ayuni said...

NAME: AYUNI BT WAHAB
ID: BHD 08-07-847
SECTION: HND1/4

Body language is very importance to attract audience when we give a speech. I have some example of Unspoken Communication – Body Language. Never underestimate the impact of body language. Sitting and reading with your head down will not engage the audience!
Standing, walking or moving around gives animation and energy.Maintain eye contact as much as possible. And than look around the room, do not focus on one person, this may make them feel uncomfortable!
The 3 second rule may be used focus on the audience and then focus on your notes for 3 seconds at a time

Wan said...

WAN AZIM BIN SHABUDDIN
BHD0807840
HND1 (3)

Assalamualaikum madam..

one of the most important speech in how to be a good speaker.

that was a nice speech where you share mistake that usually make by the speaker in giving a speech.

all the point you state above should take attention to speaker when giving the speech. that was the way how to tackle the audience and how to make the speech be more interesting, such as gesture mistake where speaker only hold something or not doing anything except stay in front like a toy which can move at all.

all the body language is most important in speech where the speaker can make their speech to something interesting because the way we talk is the way the audience got it, i mean here is when we talk in a good way so the audience will get what we say in a good way to and same in the other side.

that's all what i can share here.

thanks.

thanks.

opickz_snichi said...

Name: Mohd Taufiq b Mansor
ID: 08-07-835
Class: HND1 (Section B)

assalamualaikum.
thank you for your tips. here i want to share and add some information in body language elements.

MOVEMENT MISTAKES
• Moving without purpose. Most of the time you should stand confidently in one place rather than pacing back and forth or walking aimlessly. If you do need to move, it should have a purpose. For example, walk confidently to the front of the room before you begin speaking and walk with purpose to the flipchart or to the computer.

POSTURE MISTAKES
• Standing too stiffly. Yes, you should stand up straight but it should be natural, not like you are frozen at attention. Keep your shoulders back and hold your head up so you can make eye contact. This posture conveys confidence and helps you breathe more fully.

FACIAL EXPRESSION MISTAKES
• Not smiling, ever. Unless you are delivering horrible news, it is appropriate for you to smile, even in a business setting. Smiling will relax you and, in turn, relax the audience.

• Smiling too much, especially when delivering bad news. You may be smiling or even giggling because you are very nervous, but it undermines the seriousness of your message and your sincerity. If you smile broadly or giggle while announcing mass layoffs, for example, your audience will interpret it as a sign of your lack of concern.
If you eliminate these body language mistakes from your presentation, you'll come across as more confident and sincere and you'll be able to communicate more effectively. Your body language will reinforce your message to the audience rather than distract from it.

That all for my tips that can i shared to you all..
Thank you..

nurul said...

NAME: NURUL FAEIZAH BINTI HUSIN
ID.NO: BHD08-07-774
CLASS: HND1(SECTION4)

Assalamualaikum...

Informative topic for me and my friends. Now I already know the gesture mistake while giving a speech. Body language plays an important role in the way a message is perceived by audience. Non-verbal cues like the speaker's posture, expression, and use of gestures can help build a audience's trust in the speaker – or destroy it.Gesture mistake can make the message of the speech is not delivered to audience. Beside it shows your nervous.

1. Not Using Hands At All
If you keep your hands glued to your sides or stuffed deep in your pockets, audience are act to deduce that you are not interested in or committed to the speech or that your nerves are getting the best of you. Use your hands to make purposeful, confident gestures instead. Try to keep both of your hands above your waistline and use them to punctuate important points. Powerful gestures suggest intelligent thought and will give your listeners confidence in your message.

2. Fidgeting
Not all hand movements are good gestures. Jingling coins, tapping your nails on the desk, or popping your knuckles is both annoying and distracting to audience. These fidgeting movements will tell your audience that you are nervous, lacking polish, or outright unprofessional. A little awareness goes a long way in counteracting this type of nervous energy. Videotape yourself delivering a short speech and take note of any annoying gestures that you exhibit. The next time you catch yourself in the act, make a conscious effort to replace these nervous tics with more controlled and confident gestures.

3. Using Too Many Gestures
Gestures exude confidence, intelligence, control, and competence – unless they are overdone. Using too many gestures s can make your message seem contrived. Use your hands to emphasize key points in your messages, but do not let your gestures overshadow your words. Furthermore, make certain that your gestures match up with your spoken words. When your hand gestures contradict your words or your message,audience will doubt your sincerity.

Thank you.

S y u k said...

NAME: MUHAMMAD SYUKRI BIN RUSLI
ID: BHD 08-07-781
SECTION: HND 1 SECTION 4

salam..

without a doubt anymore, those that you've stated in the article is very important.

but i want to elaborated more about facial expression.

as normal human beings, we have emotions. emotions tell us how we feel. so, during doing public speaking, emotions is very important to show and to give more feeling to the audience.

emotions can be shown by facial expression. there is many facial expression depends on different emotions. so the use of appropriate facial expression can make your speech more lively.

you can make people more understand your speech with your facial expression. but, try not to confuse the audience. what i mean here is for example, when you talking about something urges you have to show facial expression that you are urging. not a relax expression and the audience won't take it lightly and you are successful with what you want to deliver.

aien andisma said...

siti rafidatulain binti ismail
bhd0807857
section 3
salam....
tq madam for yourgood pst...

first ,i would like to comment about Facial Expression. like you said,facial expression is another important aspect during speech. it express our emotion during the speech. for me, during the speech we need to control our facial expressions. it must be same with what we gonna to say. for example, if we say something worried we need to express our face to show like that.

Nurulatika said...

NAME: NURULATIKA BINTI SAID ABU
ID: BHD08-07-772
CLASS: HND1 SEC 1

Salam....

Your post are very interesting and I like your post. It is remind me on I am when I delivering the speech. I believe that many students have made the same thing during given the speech. It is because they are very nervous when facing many people and then talk about something in front of them. Sometimes when they are too nervous, they don't know what they've done when the speech have given.

They are many effects when the students have make body language mistake. They are:

1. The audience will not comfortable with the speaker.

2. The speech that have given will not clear.

3. The speaker doesn't look professional

4. The audience will become bored

5. The speech will have no point

That it just my opinion. So, the student should take serious with this issue. Try to overcome it and make the speech become more interesting.

Thank you.

fareiz b. adzmi said...

NAME: MOHD FAREIZ ADZMI
ID NUM: BHD 0807865
CLASS: HND 1 SECTION 1



Assalamualaikum Madam. I have read the testimony that has been posted. It is quite interesting and I have learnt many lessons from it and surely I will adapt the tips given. Well, as we all know that body language such as gestures, movement, posture and expressions play an important role while presenting a presentation or giving a speech. They should be included in our speech as they make our presentation be more exciting and unusual. However, some of us do not really know how to play with the body language in the right way. As we all have read the mistakes of body language that has always been adapted, I think that we should avoid those things. Well, the principle of non-verbal communication are supplement or replace verbal communication, regulate interaction, establishes relationship-level meaning which means responsiveness, liking and power, and reflect and expresses cultural value. Most of us fail to realize that a great deal of our communication is of a non-verbal form as opposed to the oral and written form. The static features of nonverbal communication are the distance, orientation, posture and physical contact. The distance between the speaker and the audience should not be too far. The posture of our body also should convey a degree of formality and the degree of relaxation in the communication exchange. Physical contact is also important such as shaking hands, touching, holding and pushing. next is dynamic features which are facial expressions and gestures. We should always smile to the audience and sometimes raise the eyebrow. I think, that is all I can share. Thank you. =)

faizal said...

mohd faizal
bhd0807855
hnd1 sec3

from the post overal i think it happen when the presenter in nervous.
GESTURE MISTAKES,"Keeping your hand in your pockets" this is the way to presenter to hidden their nervous.. such as when somebody want to climb stair need to hold/touch the bar side in the stair.. . but if the stair didn't have the bar in side .. the person can't climb the stair confidently. but if he/she always used the stair, they can climb confidently and easily.. what i mean is.. if presenter always going practice in real situation all the problem mention will solve easily......

slay said...

NAME: MOHD SYAZWAN BIN MOHD SALIHIN
ID NUM: BHD 08-07-866
CLASS: HND 1 SECTION 3


Assalamualaikum Madam.
Firstly thanks for your information that you post in this blog.From this, i have learn about how to use a body language when give a speech.

This is other mistakes doing by presenters that I've seen is they hiding behind the lectern.For the most part, the lectern serves as little more than a barrier between you and your audience. Presenters who are nervous about speaking often tend to use the lectern as a shield, as if they're trying to hide from their audience. There's no need to retreat from your audience if you've taken the necessary steps to prepare properly.I hope we can overcome this problem.

and thanks for your tips that u share with me.

Thank you.

KeY-MoRe said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mr_NiCe_GuY said...

NAME: MUHAMAD AZRI YUSRI BIN CHE YAHAYA
ID: BHD 08-07-874
CLASS: HND1 (SEC 4)

Assalamualaikum to Mdm. Emilia.

This is something from what I have learnt and I want to share with everyone. This is some other body language mistake.

1. Appearance
Wear clothing suitable for the audience you are speaking to. If you are not sure, ask the program planner when you are learning about your audience. When possible, dress one notch up from the audience. For men that might mean wearing a sport coat with an open collar if you know your audience will be in knit shirts and slacks. For women this might mean wearing nice slacks and sweater when speaking to a casual retreat where women will be in jeans. For most occasions in a hotel or event center, a suit and tie or silk blouse is always appropriate. Do not wear clothing that can be distracting, which might mean avoiding flashy jewelry or flamboyant shirts and scarves. For some people, of course, the flamboyant look is their trademark. Your appearance should blend in well with your content and the audience to which you are speaking.

2. Looking elsewhere when presenting
In a presentation, as you look at a slide on the screen, when you come back to the audience, pick out a specific person to make eye contact with and then broaden eye contact to the whole group. When addressing a large audience of 500 you might use the clump approach to eye contact. Look at smaller groups of 25 to 30. You can quickly scan a large audience nonverbally with this approach and it does not seem mechanical.

3. Speaking postures
Consider the mental image of "planting your feet" as you begin to speak. This will help stabilize your posture and keep you from "bouncing" on your feet while speaking. Planting conjures up the idea that you will stay in one place for a while. Having your hands in front of you or at your side when you gesture and not in a pocket or clasped together will also make you have better posture and appear more poised.

Thank you.

Sullivan Moore said...

NAME: ABDULLAH SHAKIR B MOHD NGADIL
ID: BHD08-07-802
COURSE: HND1 [1]

Assalamualaikum Madam,

When communicating, your body language (facial expressions, gestures, movement, eye contact and voice) should match your message. If there is a disconnect between what you say and your non-verbal communications, your audience will believe your non-verbals.

Movement and gestures are key components of body language. Mark Brown, past World Champion of Public Speaking, once coached me: "Gilda, stand and deliver." Rather than pacing aimlessly on stage, I should stand and deliver my message -- and move with purpose.

Try this out yourself. Before you start to speak in front of a group, no matter how small or big, walk to where you'll be standing with even, purposeful steps. Stand your ground and when you move – to the flipchart, to the other side of the room, into the audience – make it deliberate.

Here are other tips to help you use gestures and movement effectively:

How to Stand
• Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, knees relaxed. Your weight should be evenly distributed on both feet. Avoid nervous pacing or shifting from one foot to the other.

• Stand up straight - you do not need to stand like a soldier at attention, but your shoulders should be back and your head held high so you can make eye contact. This posture conveys confidence and helps you breathe more fully.

• Don't “hide” behind a desk, podium or flip chart.

What to Do With Your Hands
• Begin with your hands in the "neutral position," hanging loosely at your sides, so they will be available for natural gestures

• Avoid hands in pockets since it can lead to a sloppier posture and slouching. You also may start jingling the change in your pocket without realizing it (yes, I've seen – and heard – it happen!).

• Empty your hands. If you must hold something (your notes or the PowerPoint remote), be aware of what you are doing. I've seen speakers unconsciously fold their notes into little squares - how's that for distracting?

• Be aware of what your empty hands are doing – "washing" each other, grasping each other tightly, playing with your watch, etc.

• Don't point at the audience. Yes, your mother was right – it's not polite to point. Try an open-handed gesture instead.

How to Use Gestures
• Whether they come naturally to you or you have to work at them, gestures can help communicate your ideas and a little goes a long way.

• Use a variety of smooth, deliberate and natural gestures that support and visually illustrate your message.

• Use the "fisherman gesture." Remember the fisherman telling the story "I caught a fish THIS big" with his arms open wide? That gesture is a visual clue to what his words are telling you.

• Use the "on the one hand… , on the other hand" gesture to show both sides of the issue.

Gestures and movement provide the visuals that accompany your words. Learning to use them effectively will help you convey your message with confidence and your audience will see your message instead of just hearing it.

b!Ntang said...

NAME: NAJMUL ASYIFA' BT AZHAR
ID: BHD08-07-792
COURSE: HND1 [1]

salam.. public speaking body language mistakes? what the mistake? now i would like to shared with you all The Importance of Body Language When Public Speaking..

Did you know that while you're saying one thing during a speech, your body could be telling your audience something entirely different?


Consider the case of a presenter who is presenting facts to her roomful of listeners. She's discussing a subject that's supposedly a topic of interest to her… but her arms are crossed and she's leaning backwards ever-so-slightly. Consequently, her message is being sabotaged by her body language which is, in essence, telling people to "back away".

Here, we'll look at some common body language errors made by even seasoned presenters and how you can learn to avoid them when in front of a crowd.

Problem: Crossed Arms
Crossing your arms creates an instant barrier between you and whomever you're speaking to. You're essentially telling everyone, "I am not being completely open; I'm going to hide some part of me." Often, presenters who have a habit of standing with their arms crossed are seen as "deceptive" or "untrustworthy".

Solution: Work on Being "Open"

The next time you notice that you're about to cross your arms (or have already done so), slowly allow them to fall comfortably next to you. If you're restless, try holding on to the podium or table in front of you, thereby giving your limbs something to do.



Problem: Not Making Eye Contact
During a presentation, a public speaker needs to be able to make eye contact with the audience members. Typically, that contact only lasts for 1-2 seconds per person, but it's essential. By not matching the gaze of others, the presenter's body is saying, "I don't want to look at you because I'm not telling the truth."

Solution: Practice Eye Contact

Whenever you speak with another person, make certain to force yourself to make eye contact. If you're at a party and are standing in a small group of 3-4 people, practice moving your gaze from one person to the next while you're talking. Eventually, this will become more natural and will not feel forced when you're making speeches.



Problem: Showing No Expression
Have you ever seen someone who speaks without exhibiting any expressions at all? It's almost eerie and definitely disconcerting. Onlookers usually wonder if the person is interested in his or her topic area and may eventually tune the speaker out, assuming (often wrongly) that the subject matter can't be that important.

Solution: Use the Mirror to Rehearse

The next time you are scheduled to publicly speak, rehearse in front of a mirror, paying special attention to your facial expressions. Are you smiling? Do you seem approachable, believable and friendly? Are you sending the right message with your eyes, mouth and eyebrows? As you become more comfortable allowing yourself to show emotions, your speeches will be stronger and better received.



Problem: Wandering Around the Stage or Room
Are your legs restless? Do you rock back and forth while talking or move aimlessly around, uncertain where to stop? This is not only distracting for audience members, it also makes them feel uneasy, as if you're going to bolt out the door at any given moment!

Solution: Plant Yourself and Only Move Deliberately

This is an extremely common problem faced by many public speakers, but overcoming it will require some serious resolve. You'll have to be ultra-aware of where your feet are at all times, and you may simply have to "plant" yourself in one spot for the duration of your talk. Of course, if you're planning on speaking for a long time, you may wish to move occasionally; however, when you do, be deliberate. Pick a spot, walk there (slowly) and remain there.

thank you(",)

Hey Hazman said...

Name: MUHAMMAD HAZMAN BIN MANSOR
ID: BHD08-07-830
Class: HND1 Section 3
Body language plays a big role when giving a speech. The body language usually attracts the audience to hear to our speech. When giving a speech, we do not want to look like a stone that produce sounds. In the other way, we also do not want to look like a clown. So, a right body language can be made to attract the audience. Sometimes mistakes been made is unseen by the speaker themselves. So a right practice of gesture, movement, posture and even facial expression must be conduct during preparation of a speech. Practices will avoid us from being a clown or even looks like a stone.

kiki~ekin said...

NOORASYIKIN MOHD NOORZALY
BHD08-07-858
HND1(section3)

Nobody perfect. So that no one who does not make mistakes. So when we do the mistake, we must relax and do not panic.

Public speaking body language mistakes?

Body language includes your posture, movement, gestures, facial expressions, eye contact and voice. When you do mistake of that, people will know that you're not ready in your speech. So that u must prepare early your speech.

Facial expression can help you to understand your audience what are you trying to said what you feel. So, audience will know your feel and automatically they can feel what you feel. By that they can said that you're giving a good speech to them. So you must be careful with that to avoid you do the mistake.

Next eye contact and voice are important when you giving a speech. It is because audience will know whether you're nervous or not. So to avoid you feel nervous, you must prepare before speech. For example, ask your friend first to hear your speech and give a feedback. So that you will know what advantages and disadvantage from that. So you can improve your speech.

Thank you..

Syarifah Nur Liyana said...

NAME: SYARIFAH NUR LIYANA BINTI SYED NAZARUDIN
ID NO: BHD 08-07-767
CLASS: HND 1 / SECTION 2

Salam,

Thank you for all the points. All the point will reminds me that it is important that we must be careful with our attitude when to give a speech. Facial expression, eye contact, gestures, voice and movement is most part that we must be careful.

Thank you.

khaliq said...

name: khaliq naru b abd hamid
id:bhd 08-07-806
section: hnd section

really helpful tips for presenting a speech, and i would like to add a few tips about the body language

Eye contact

The eyes communicate powerful cognitive messages. Presenters should not underestimate their ability to persuade an audience with their eyes.
Following are tips to achieve better eye contact with an audience

When speaking from notes, follow these rules:
o Look at your notes
o Absorb one idea
o Make eye contact with individuals in the audience
o Speak your full idea
o Repeat this pattern

Facial expressions

Facial expressions also communicate cognitive messages and emotions. They enhance your verbal communication by producing "feeling tone," the impression that you care about what you're saying.
The following tips will help you use facial expressions to increase your persuasiveness:
• Smile before you begin speaking
• Don't be either mechanical or melodramatic; act naturally
• Think about what you're saying and react with facial expressions to match or enhance the thought
Hand gestures
Hand gestures are important to emphasize words and emotions, illustrate verbal messages, or even replace verbal messages altogether.
Following are tips on using better hand gestures:
• Keep your hands by your side or neutrally in front of you, unless you can use them to make a point.
• Avoid doing the following with your hands:
o Putting them behind your back
o Putting them in your pockets
o Putting them in front of you
o Using them to fidget
• Keep most gestures at chest level
• Think about what you're saying and react with hand gestures to match or enhance your message
Posture
Posture is an important element of your body language because it can communicate your message with confidence.
Following are tips for achieving better posture:
• Before your presentation, sit or stand straight
• Walk confidently to the podium
• Assume the "basic speaker stance," which is as follows:
o Feet 12-18 inches apart and turned slightly outward
o Weight evenly distributed over the balls of both feet
o Body leaning slightly toward the audience
o Hands at sides
o Elbows loose

lah said...

Name: ABDULLAH BIN ISMAIL SHAUKI
ID NO: BHD08-07-841
Class: HND 1(sec 3)

Assalamua'laikum, Madam Mimi..

Thanks for the tips, it really help me a lot. I will try to improve my speaking skill based on your tips. I also want to add a little of my opinion to avoid mistake in body language.

1) Use movement of your arm.
- If you just standing there and stand like a statue, how you want to attract people to listen to your speech? When start a speech, using your movement of your arm will attract the audience. You can swing your hand, your arm, raise your arm, knuckle your fingers and also touch the audience's shoulder.

2) Make a joke, singing, dancing and acting.
- Start your speech with all of the above and you will find by the audience so attractive and you get your chance to they sit there till your ending. But make sure your joke, singing, dancing and acting related to your speech because if don't they will just listen half to your speech or maybe a little.

3) Don't stand on just one place.
- Try using all the area of the stage by walking of it. Make sure you don't stand like a statue in one place, it will make the audience bored. Try using the stage like the stage as your home or your kitchen that you walk through it everyday.

pijo jonas said...

Nurhafiza Bt Yazulla
BHD08-07-784
HND1(2)

Assalamualaikum Madam,

Thanks for the tips. I am totally agree with this article. We should be aware with our movement, gesture, posture and facial expression while delivering our speech. This is because these are the things that the audience will see in our speech. Other than that, if we have a good movement, gesture, posture, and facial expression, our confident level will increase.

Here, I want to share with all of you the tips on good facial expression. Firstly, be yourself. Do not try to copy the facial expression style of someone else. Next, Do not overdo it. Some people intentionally try to control their facial expressions by forcing themselves to smile or use another expression that isn't natural to them. Watch out for fake facial expressions that have a negative impact on your speech or compromise your sincerity.

Other than that, Practice in front of a mirror.You will notice what expressions you use while speaking other than study how to control your facial expressions through it. Create different moods is also one of the tip of good facial expression. While practicing in front of the mirror, see if your facial expressions convey the mood you want to create. If your face isn't showing any emotion, stop, refocus, and try again.

Last but not least, Think about what you are saying. Focus on your message and communicating with your audience, and your facial expressions will follow. you should also smile before you begin your speech.

Thats all and thank you.

nurhayati bt mohd junaidi said...

NURHAYATI BT MOHD JUNAIDI
BHD08-07-795
HND1 SECTION2

Assalamualaikum...
what the public speaking language???About our gestures, movement, posture & facial expressions???

I can give some other info about gestures and movement.

When communicating, your body language (facial expressions, gestures, movement, eye contact and voice) should match your message. If there is a disconnect between what you say and your non-verbal communications, your audience will believe your non-verbals.

Movement and gestures are key components of body language. Mark Brown, past World Champion of Public Speaking, once coached me: "Gilda, stand and deliver." Rather than pacing aimlessly on stage, I should stand and deliver my message -- and move with purpose.

Try this out yourself. Before you start to speak in front of a group, no matter how small or big, walk to where you'll be standing with even, purposeful steps. Stand your ground and when you move - to the flipchart, to the other side of the room, into the audience - make it deliberate.

Here are other tips to help you use gestures and movement effectively:

How to Stand

* Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, knees relaxed. Your weight should be evenly distributed on both feet. Avoid nervous pacing or shifting from one foot to the other.
* Stand up straight - you do not need to stand like a soldier at attention, but your shoulders should be back and your head held high so you can make eye contact. This posture conveys confidence and helps you breathe more fully.
* Don't "hide" behind a desk, podium or flip chart.

What to Do With Your Hands

* Begin with your hands in the "neutral position," hanging loosely at your sides, so they will be available for natural gestures
* Avoid hands in pockets since it can lead to a sloppier posture and slouching. You also may start jingling the change in your pocket without realizing it (yes, I've seen - and heard - it happen!).
* Empty your hands. If you must hold something (your notes or the PowerPoint remote), be aware of what you are doing. I've seen speakers unconsciously fold their notes into little squares - how's that for distracting?
* Be aware of what your empty hands are doing - "washing" each other, grasping each other tightly, playing with your watch, etc.
* Don't point at the audience. Yes, your mother was right - it's not polite to point. Try an open-handed gesture instead.

How to Use Gestures

* Whether they come naturally to you or you have to work at them, gestures can help communicate your ideas and a little goes a long way.
* Use a variety of smooth, deliberate and natural gestures that support and visually illustrate your message.
* Use the "fisherman gesture." Remember the fisherman telling the story "I caught a fish THIS big" with his arms open wide? That gesture is a visual clue to what his words are telling you.
* Use the "on the one hand, on the other hand" gesture to show both sides of the issue.

Gestures and movement provide the visuals that accompany your words. Learning to use them effectively will help you convey your message with confidence and your audience will see your message instead of just hearing it.

thank you...

Sullivan Moore said...

NAME: ABDULLAH SHAKIR B MOHD NGADIL
ID:BHD08-07-802
COURSE: HND1 [1]

Assalamualaikum Madam Mimi

the body language in public speaking is important during giving a speech

Did you know that while you're saying one thing during a speech, your body could be telling your audience something entirely different?

Consider the case of a presenter who is presenting facts to her roomful of listeners. She's discussing a subject that's supposedly a topic of interest to her… but her arms are crossed and she's leaning backwards ever-so-slightly. Consequently, her message is being sabotaged by her body language which is, in essence, telling people to "back away".

This scenario is akin to a husband telling his wife, "I love you and I'm so happy with you," while he's emotionlessly staring out the window and turning away from her, avoiding all eye and body contact. Though he's stating one set of facts, he's acting in a completely opposite fashion.

As a public speaker, it's critical that you become aware of what your body is "saying" to your audience. Even if you're simply nervous, shy, cold or physically uncomfortable, you must make your movements and stance correspond with your verbal delivery.

Here, we'll look at some common body language errors made by even seasoned presenters and how you can learn to avoid them when in front of a crowd.

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mahfuzah said...

NAME: MAHFUZAH BINTI Ja
ID: BHD08-01-721
Class: (SECTION 1)

Hi to Mrs Mimi ..

from my body language affects our speech, it can help us dispel the feeling nervous, and facing the audience with a sense of confidence with this body language. if we have a problem with the notice we will be nervous silence alone. using body language can be more convincing themselves and can interact with the audience with confidence. body language is very important for speech.

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